Jonathan Finley

Semiconductor Nanostructures and Quantum Systems

Technical University Munich

Walter Schottky Institute

85745 Garching

Tel. +49 89 289 12770

jonathan.finley[at]wsi.tum.de

Group webpage

Description

Research focus: semiconductor nanostructure, nanotechnology, quantum optics

The chair for Semiconductor Nanostructures and Quantum Systems explores a wide range of topics related to the fundamental physics of nanostructured materials and their quantum-electronic and -photonic properties.

Members of the institute study the unique electronic, photonic and quantum properties of materials patterned over nanometer lengthscales and explore how sub-components can be integrated together to realise entirely new materials with emergent properties.

This convergence of materials-nanotechnology, quantum electronics and photonics is strongly interdisciplinary, spanning topics across the physical sciences, as well as materials science and engineering. Current research focuses on:

  • The development and exploration of quantum semiconductor nanomaterials such as artificial atoms, molecules and nanowires and two-dimensional crystals;
  • Nanophotonics, including photonic crystals and plasmonic materials and their use to enhance interactions between light and matter;
  • The manipulation and exploitation of quantum coherence in integrated nanosystems.

Full details of the research topics being pursued are presented on our research pages. Our research is funded by various sources including the German Science Foundation, the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research , the European Union and the Technical University of Munich via the TUM International Graduate School of Science and Engineering and the TUM Institute of Advanced Study.

Publications

Site-selectively generated photon emitters in monolayer MoS2 via local helium ion irradiation

J. Klein, M. Lorke, M. Florian, F. Sigger, J. Wierzbowski, J. Cerne, K. Müller, T. Taniguchi, K. Watanabe, U. Wurstbauer, M. Kaniber, M. Knap, R. Schmidt, J. Finley, A. Holleitner.

Nature Communications 10, Article number: 2755 (2019).

Show Abstract

Quantum light sources in solid-state systems are of major interest as a basic ingredient for integrated quantum photonic technologies. The ability to tailor quantum emitters via site-selective defect engineering is essential for realizing scalable architectures. However, a major difficulty is that defects need to be controllably positioned within the material. Here, we overcome this challenge by controllably irradiating monolayer MoS2 using a sub-nm focused helium ion beam to deterministically create defects. Subsequent encapsulation of the ion exposed MoS2 flake with high-quality hBN reveals spectrally narrow emission lines that produce photons in the visible spectral range. Based on ab-initio calculations we interpret these emission lines as stemming from the recombination of highly localized electron–hole complexes at defect states generated by the local helium ion exposure. Our approach to deterministically write optically active defect states in a single transition metal dichalcogenide layer provides a platform for realizing exotic many-body systems, including coupled single-photon sources and interacting exciton lattices that may allow the exploration of Hubbard physics.

DOI: 0.1038/s41467-019-10632-z

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